Yamaha U1H Upright (Refurbished)

//Yamaha U1H Upright (Refurbished)

Yamaha U1H Upright (Refurbished)

£4,795.00

Piano Details

Height – 121cm
Width – 150cm
Depth – 61cm
Finish – Black with Brass finish

Warranty – 3 years
Includes a complimentary first tuning within the first 2 months of purchase

Excludes Delivery

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Description

Craftsmanship and innovation, in perfect harmony.

The Yamaha U Series of upright pianos have been the choice of professional pianists, recording studios and music schools for many decades . With sturdy construction for years of reliable service, the Yamaha U Series of pianos offer a sparkling tone and ultra responsive action to meet the demands of the most accomplished pianist.

For over a century, Yamaha has blended a tradition of craftsmanship with innovations in modern materials and sound to create pianos of exceptional tone and breathtaking beauty.

Nippon Gakki Co. Ltd. (currently Yamaha Corporation) was established in 1887 as a reed organ manufacturer by Torakusu Yamaha in Hamamatsu, Shizuoka Prefecture and was incorporated on October 12, 1897. In 1900 the company started the production of pianos. The first piano to be made in Japan was an upright built in 1900 by Torakusu Yamaha, founder of Nippon Gakki Co., Ltd. — later renamed Yamaha Corporation.[2] The company’s origins as a musical instrument manufacturer are still reflected today in the group’s logo—a trio of interlocking tuning forks.[3][2]

After World War II, company president Genichi Kawakami repurposed the remains of the company’s war-time production machinery and the company’s expertise in metallurgical technologies to the manufacture of motorcycles. The YA-1 (AKA Akatombo, the “Red Dragonfly”), of which 125 were built in the first year of production (1954), was named in honour of the founder. It was a 125cc, single cylinder, two-stroke street bike patterned after the German DKW RT 125 (which the British munitions firm, BSA, had also copied in the post-war era and manufactured as the Bantam and Harley-Davidson as the Hummer). In 1955,[4] the success of the YA-1 resulted in the founding of Yamaha Motor Co., Ltd., splitting the motorcycle division from the company. Also, in 1954 the Yamaha Music School was founded.[2]

Yamaha has grown to become the world’s largest manufacturer of musical instruments (including pianos, “silent” pianos, drums, guitars, brass instruments, woodwinds, violins, violas, celli, and vibraphones), as well as a leading manufacturer of semiconductors, audio/visual, computer related products, sporting goods, home appliances, specialty metals and industrial robots.[5] Yamaha released the Yamaha CS-80 in 1977.

Yamaha made the first commercially successful digital synthesizer, the Yamaha DX7, in 1983.

In 1988, Yamaha shipped the world’s first CD recorder.[6] Yamaha purchased Sequential Circuits in 1988.[7] It bought a majority stake (51%) of competitor Korg in 1987, which was bought out by Korg in 1993.[8] Yamaha Ginza Building in Tokyo, the largest musical instrument store in Japan. The complex including shopping area, concert hall and music studio

In the late 1990s, Yamaha released a series of portable battery operated keyboards under the PSS and the PSR range of keyboards. The Yamaha PSS-14 and PSS-15 keyboards were upgrades to the Yamaha PSS-7 and were notable for their short demo songs, short selectable phrases, funny sound effects and distortion and crackly sounds progressing on many volume levels when battery power is low.[9]

In 2002, Yamaha closed down its archery product business that was started in 1959. Six archers in five different Olympic Games won gold medals using their products.[10]

In January 2005, it acquired German audio software manufacturer Steinberg from Pinnacle Systems. In July 2007, Yamaha bought out the minority shareholding of the Kemble family in Yamaha-Kemble Music (UK) Ltd, Yamaha’s UK import and musical instrument and professional audio equipment sales arm, the company being renamed Yamaha Music U.K. Ltd in autumn 2007.[11] Kemble & Co. Ltd, the UK piano sales & manufacturing arm, was unaffected.[12]

On December 20, 2007, Yamaha made an agreement with the Austrian Bank BAWAG P.S.K. Group BAWAG to purchase all the shares of Bösendorfer,[13] intended to take place in early 2008. Yamaha intends to continue manufacturing at the Bösendorfer facilities in Austria.[14] The acquisition of Bösendorfer was announced after the NAMM Show in Los Angeles, on January 28, 2008. As of February 1, 2008, Bösendorfer Klavierfabrik GmbH operates as a subsidiary of Yamaha Corp.[15]

Yamaha Corporation is also widely known for their music teaching programme that began in the 1950s. Yamaha electronics have proven to be successful, popular and respected products. For example, the Yamaha YPG-625 was awarded “Keyboard of the Year” and “Product of the Year” in 2007 from The Music and Sound Retailer magazine.[16] Other noteworthy Yamaha electronics include the SHS-10 Keytar, a consumer-priced keytar which offered MIDI output features normally found on much more expensive keyboards.